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January 22, 2013

Comments

Angelo

The inflated prices are actually to cover the uninsured----or really, anyone who walks into an ER or hospital who requires treatment----but who can't pay for it. That's anyone----American citizen, taxpayer or not. And he crows about how under Obamacare, there will be rewards for doctors to keep costs/billing down (in other words, punishment if the doctors rack up too many expenses). Doesn't he understand that this could lead to the rationing that we're all terrified of? That doctors will not order tests, will not admit "marginal" cases to the hospitals, etc.? This government meddling with my ability to seek medical attention for myself and my family needs to stop. Again----$55,000 was never going to be collected. And again----the $16.00 Tylenol means that hospitals grab as much from insured people as they can----to pay for the people they MUST TREAT, BY LAW, who won't pay them a red cent. The system isn't great. But the medical care is----and if we try to imitate what other countries are doing----we'll end up with medical care as crappy as they have----the "care" that drives their citizens with means to travel great distances to be treated here.

Michael Brent

Don't worry about a thing.
With Obamacare were all going to have free health insurance! It'll be great!
Just ask Nancy Pelosi.

Angelo

Michael: Yes----it's funny how the lawmakers granted themselves an exemption----and then Obama granted the exemption to unions too, and a few other supporters. They themselves know people railroaded into this (most of us) are going to suffer. They've managed to extract themselves and their hardcore support from the mess. It's unbelievable.

Angelo

Oh, and on the topic of cat bites: My brother in law came close to losing a finger over what appeared to be a minor cat bite. The doctor told him if he had waited another day to come in----amputation might have been the only option. No hospitalization in that case. Just antibiotics and close monitoring. He healed up.

Tom Welch

The American health system is grossly overrated, under performs, and costly. How come the rest of the developed countries have universal health care at lower costs and live longer than Americans.

Angelo

Tom: I think culturally----the living longer part you mention is probably due to diets in some of those countries that are higher in fiber, lower in fat and less processed food----more exercising, etc. People will walk a few blocks to mail a letter or grab a coffee instead of driving. All of that adds up to better overall health and longer life. Also, in some countries, there isn't as much exposure to chemicals, gases, etc. that we in the U.S. have. But I think you're wrong about our healthcare being overrated. I wait a few days, not a month or more, for something like a CT scan. We have terrific surgeons and the best diagnostic equipment----and more of it----than anywhere else in the world. Our researchers and drug companies have given the world more breakthroughs for treating horrible diseases----than anyone else has from any other nation. Many communicable serious conditions were all but wiped out in the U.S. by the 1970s----only to be reintroduced more recently by more travel and people moving to the U.S. from other places. I think the "system" needs improvement----but the people, equipment and delivery of healthcare here is quite good. I think that's evidenced by the thousands of people from other nations with socialized medicine----who if they have the means, come here for treatment when they're very sick. That isn't opinion, it's fact. Sadly, I now see a future where because our SYSTEM has been hijacked by Washington, older Americans who are written off by government death panels will be taking their hard earned money to India, Israel or other places after they're told to "make yourself comfortable and die" here. It's infuriating.

Tom Welch

Yes, "only to be reintroduced more recently by more travel and people moving to the U.S. from other places" I actually did a project many years ago where the state of FL wanted to track people coming into the US with medical issues. The problem with the American system is that it is fragment and the incentives are all wrong. I deal with the health system every other day since I'm on dialysis...it sucks, keeping people alive so they can charge Medicare like it is their debit card.

Angelo

Tom: No doubt----you are right that the system of delivery is broken and so too are the incentives. It's backwards in many ways. That said----if my life depends on it----I want to be treated in a good U.S. hospital instead of anywhere else. That's not to say there aren't exceptional doctors and facilities elsewhere----there are. But on average, I think you're better off in the U.S. I would love to see them preserve the good things we have and correct the nonsense. The "Affordable Care Act" fell way short----and I think will cause more problems than solutions. That's unfortunate.

Tom Welch

Affordable Care Act is in need of a major tune up, soon.

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