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September 03, 2013

Comments

Angelo

But depending on the consumer/collector: There might be a stronger desire for 5 good watches instead of one very good watch. I don't think there's any shame in going for quantity with reasonable quality over better quality with a quantity of one. Variety can be the spice of life.

herculodge

What I'm finding is that the more I learn about watches, the more expensive become my tastes, making cheaper impulse buys an impediment to the watches I really want.

Angelo

And I think the most interesting part of this will be----based on what you learn----or have learned----what will your ultimate cash cap be on how much you should spend on a watch? In other words, will your education of watches show that the more you spend, the better the watch----up to and including watches that are $30,000 or more? Will that make you feel compromised wearing a $2500.00 watch? Or, will it be that watches that sell for 2K-3K are as good in every meaningful way, as watches costing 25K? Because for the person who buys $25.00 watches twice a year at Wal-Mart, that is an impdediment to them waiting two years to buy a hundred dollar Invicta, that is probably a much better watch than any they've ever had. Likewise, 4 purchases of $2500.00 watches stop the owner from laying out 10 grand for something really special.

Michael Brent

Fussing over fashion watches compromises your manly.

jonnybardo

Angelo, I hear you. There are a few factors at play, one of which is the degree to which an individual collector enjoys diversity - what their "taste profile" is.

Check out the first picture in this blog entry of mine:

http://discipleofchronos.wordpress.com/2013/08/29/a-new-way-forward/

That collector has an incredible collection of (presumably) only three watches (he posted that picture on a "what's in you stable?" thread on Watchuseek). To me his tastes run very similar to mine in that he has three watches that are all thematically related, but have quite distinct styles, and are incredible examples of those styles.

I've found that my taste profile centers on diver watches along a spectrum consisting of two general types: dive tools, especially micro-divers, on one end, and slightly dressy sports watches like the Seiko Sumo or Citizen Signature. I don't wear any dress watches; to me a dress watch is the Citizen Signature or the Sumo.

If I took that guy's approach I would trade all of my watches in for the best in both category that I could afford, maybe a Zixen Nitrox II on the dive tool end, and an Oris Titan on the other. Then eventually I could work my way up so that I have the more expensive Kobold on the dive tool end and an Omega Seamaster on the "classy sporty" end.

But the thing is, I like greater diversity. I like watches in-between the two spectrums, like the Orient Saturation Diver. I like a variety of different watches to wear, depending upon mood. But I've also found that the collection starts getting wobbly after about a dozen watches; at that point I end up with a lot of watches that I never wear.

This gave me an idea for a blog entry, which I'll compose in a bit.

jonnybardo

One more thing, with regards to cost of watches. Of course there's the simple function of relationship to one's salary. The only other non-essential purchases I make on a regular basis are books and occasionally music downloads. There are other odds and ends here and there, but watches are my main non-essential expenditure. And, to be honest, I spend way more than I should.

But with regards to the absolute maximum I would ever spend, it relates to how much I make. I see it more as looking at how much I'd be willing to spend over an entire year, then deciding how many watches I can buy with that - and at what cost. So let's say I decide that I'm OK spend $2K a year on watches; I can either buy one affordable watch every month, or one micro-diver every season, or one low-end luxury watch every year. I'm not saying that's the numbers I'm looking at, but its about right, I think.

But the other issue is the problem of wearing an expensive watch. I'm one of those men that wears clothes out, spills mustard on my shirt, and pulls my shoes on without untying the laces, thereby reducing the life of my shoes. Over the last five years or so I've probably gone through that many laptops; I tend to wear them down, and have left the in places where my youngest found a way to destroy them (happened twice, once Death By Beer Spillage - mine, not hers).

In terms of $1K+ watches that I'd like to own someday, three come most readily to mind: a chronograph Omega Seamaster (~$3K), a Breitling Avenger or Blackbird ($2-5K), a Seiko MarineMaster 600m (~$4K), and a Panerai Submersible ($5-10K). But I really wouldn't feel comfortable wearing any of those right now, unless it was a used Omega or Breitling. In other words, even if I didn't buy a watch for a year and a half and saved up a "Breitling Fund," I'd be very hesitant to actually buy one because I'd be worried about damaging it.

I should really keep these long replies to my own blog, so I'll cut this off now and apologize for the long-windedness!

Angelo

Jonny: RE:, "Discriminating Purchases:" I wonder, if you should have a "Waiting Period" implemented on those purchases, particularly if you plan to spend over a certain dollar amount? Sort of like the gun buyers waiting period some states have. Or like this one: A beautiful young woman who works in our New York office (but who visits my region on business), met me for tours and lunch last week. One "unique" aspect of this woman is that she has no tattoos (seems as though EVERYONE is getting them nowadays). I'm not sure how we even got on the topic, but she told me that when she was a few years younger, she wanted tattoos badly. Her Mom (who no doubt does not like tattoos) told her: "Sure, okay, you could get a tattoo like that. I want you to wait a year. If a year from now, you still want that tattoo----in that design----you can get it and I will even pay for it. Twice----the young lady decided she wanted a tattoo. And both times----when the year was up, she wondered what she was thinking and was very happy she never got the tattoo. Now, I don't suggest a one year waiting period. But what about a month? If you're going to throw down $500.00 for a watch----I wonder if you should wait a month and see if your desire builds even more----or declines, and you find something else you "must have" instead. Then, start the clock ticking again.

jonnybardo

That's a good plan and one I actually follow for more expensive purchases (say, over $300). Its one thing to make a $150 impulse buy on the Invicta Sunday Run, and another to make a $700 impulse buy on a micro-diver.

Speaking of tattoos, my wife got one when she was 14-years old and kind of regrets it now. But she got a new one a couple years ago and loves it (she's 35 now). I like tattoos but such permanent decisions are best made after 25, maybe 30!

What you say also applies to gender re-assignment surgery, by the way. I believe someone has to declare their intention and has to wait a whole year before they can get "the cut." Probably a good thing!

Angelo

Indeed. I heard on the radio----someone who had gender reassignment surgery---now wants to change back.

Ulysses

This comment thread gives me déjà vu... Basically, a quick fling with a garish and gaudy cheap watch will likely leave you with regret. Something you have strived and saved for probably will not. You secretly lust after that classy timepiece in the shop window, all glittering and perfect, and resent that you're so impulsive and impatient that you can't resist the slutty charms of that new Invicta with more ribs and knobs on it than a sex toy. It looks shocking, attention-grabbing (for all the wrong reasons), but after a while you'll find it wearing you down, its flavour-of-the-month novelty spent. You'll see it as the Lady Gaga of watches - how much more naked/shocking can you possibly get?

Sorry if that all sounds a little crass, but like I said, we've been here before. If you were genuinely, truly happy with your bargain purchases you wouldn't be so torn. That you are indicates that you want to change your spending habits but haven't yet been able to muster the will to do so. I think you'd be much happier with one or two truly high-end pieces - something that unequivocally and quietly says that its pedigree, its status, its level of refinement and engineering is beyond reproach and debate.

I personally don't own a watch as beautiful or well built (or as expensive) as an Oris. Someday I will, but in the mean time I won't be spending my money on stepping stones that leave me unsatisfied and regretful. I have one or two watches that I do regret buying and I am not going there again. I can wait.

Ulysses

Oh, and if you are worried about damaging an expensive watch, just wear a cheap beater for the rough stuff and keep that nice watch for the times when you want to feel special. It's not a reason not to buy one. I don't always wear that fancy aftershave every single day but I still buy it.

Angelo

Well, if Invicta is the party girl that sleeps around----and you regret participating in that scene----I wonder where that leaves me with Tauchmeister/Aeromatic? I consider those lines, that girl you're friends with----but every once in a while, you both drink too much, and....some shame maybe, but not nearly as much as with the sleep around chick named Invicta! They both might be doing the same thing, but one is much better known for it than the other.

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