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July 14, 2014

Comments

jonnybardo

It is crazy to think that the Omega Speedmaster, aka the "Moon watch," was considered large in the 60s and 70s. It was 39mm across the bezel.

As the article says, watch size is relative to human size. Arnold Schwarzenegger can sport much larger watches than Pee Wee Herman. Some people don't buy this, and think watch size is not relative. This is ridiculous, in my mind.

But I know that you and I both have 7.5" wrists, but some watches look good on you that don't on me because my forearms are smaller. Or look at that picture on the top if the second page - that huge watch looks good on that guy because his arms are huge, while the Rolex looks a bit small.

As you know, my tastes have changed over time. I think I fit into that 90% demographic mentioned in the last paragraph, that prefers watches in the 40-44mm range or daily wear. I like having one or two big watches like my Zixen or OSD, but wouldn't want anything bigger than that (45mm, 17mm thick).

jonnybardo

One thing the article says doesn't fit with my trajectory - they say that once you start wearing big watches you don't go back. I went up in size preference and then back down. I do think there's a "Watch Feng Shui" so that every person has an aesthetic ideal range that isn't entirely subjective. So mine is probably 41-43mm. Yours seems to be 44-46mm.

Angelo

I have no problems moving between 35MM classics and massive Invicta or Tauchmeister models. I guess the first few moments of my smallest or largest watch take some adjustments (mental more than physical) but for the most part, I'm happy with any size and it depends on what I'm wearing and my mood as to which watch I'll decide to wear. I honestly don't think there should be hard and fast rules on this----if the wearer feels good about it and confident----I don't think a watch is too large or too small.

Ulysses

As I said in that article, just wear what looks right for your body type/shape. We do that for every other article of clothing, so the same rule should apply to watches. As adults we're expected to learn what looks good on us and what doesn't. If the size of a watch gives you pause, then it's probably a bit too big (or small) and you have to ask yourself why you're tempted to wear it (unless it is for a specific purpose).

We live in a culture where boldness and over-confidence is often rewarded, but that can skew our perception of what is rational and reasonable. Of all the people who appear in talent shows, how many can really sing? How many believe mistakenly that they can sing and are in fact terrible? How many people wear a watch the size of a dinner plate and think they look cool but appear to most people as fashion victims? A little restraint and an awareness of your physique will pay dividends. Arnie and Sly can wear big watches and need them, because they're big men. It works. I have a seven and a quarter inch wrist so I wouldn't wear anything above say a 45mm watch, though this would also be affected by how large the watch "wears" - i.e how the design makes the watch look bulkier or smaller depending on thickness, dial to bezel ratio etc. I wouldn't mind being bigger like them but i'm not and probably never will be without shifting lots of iron, so if I borrowed their suits and shirts they'd look loose and ridiculous on me, and so would their watches.

Angelo

Ulysses: I think it also goes beyond someone's physical size and ventures into their "image" in general. I might be about the same size (and age) as Deion Sanders. He can wear a suit that would fit me----but would look ridiculous on me. Yet he could look really good wearing that suit. I think people can develop an image that works for them, even coloring outside the lines. When it comes to watches, my counterparts who travel from New York City to Washington, DC to attend meetings that I'm part of----now expect me to be wearing an attention grabbing watch and seem disappointed if I go with one of my "conventional" pieces. One of the ways I became interested in "larger than average" watches was when one of the Account Executives from NY wore one when visiting my region. I was mesmerized by it, though I thought it looked "too big" on him when I first saw it. I do think it's walking a fine line, wearing the biggest, boldest watches. People who know me well get it---and like it. I do fear that if I go into a meeting wearing one of the behemoths, people who are unfamiliar with me might consider me a buffoon. But at the root of it all----I like all of my watches. There are many times when the only person who sees the watch I am wearing that day----is me. I love to admire my own watches when talking on the phone or when stuck in traffic.

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