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December 06, 2014

Comments

jonnybardo

Demetri, how do you tell how good the chip is? Any other characteristics I should look for?

jonnybardo

@Demetri, a couple secondary questions. It seems you're linking to a lot of refurbished. Do you think that's the way to go in terms of getting quality for value?

Secondly, if I want to stick to point and shoot, which options do you think are best quality? I was reading some reviews of the Olympus XZ-2 and people raving about the quality. Any others that you recommend that could be had for under $300?

herculodge

Jonny, maybe this article will help with the camera at the price point you're looking for: http://www.techriggs.com/5-best-digital-camera-under-300-dollars/

Gary

Jonny,

Pixel size has a direct relationship to noise in low light. Small sensors with high resolution means tiny pixels, which implies poorer performance in low light.

http://www.dpreview.com/glossary/camera-system/sensor-sizes

As you can see from the article, the typical point and shoot camera has a tiny sensor.

All else being equal, getting a larger sensor with a given resolution should give better performance in low light (less noise).

Some cameras have an image stacking mode that takes several short exposures and combines them to average out random noise in low light, giving much lower apparent noise. Sony calls this feature Handheld Twilight mode, and I can attest that it greatly improves blurring and noise on low light photos. They have this feature on many of their point and shoot cameras as well as their larger ILC cameras (formerly called NEX).

jonnybardo

Thanks Gary. What defines a "larger sensor?" Which number should I look for?

Paul

did you try this fix?
http://support.apple.com/en-us/TS1440

Gary

Jonny,

I'd say a Micro 4/3, as used in the Olympus PEN or OM-D models, or larger, like an APC-C sensor, as used in most DSLRs. Of course, the larger the sensor, the larger the camera is likely to be.

Some cameras get decent results with a so-called 1" sensor, as used in the Sony RX100 models. The Mk III version of the latter is preferred, as it has a built in EVF, but the Mk I and Mk II are selling for cheaper prices now. This is an example of a pocketable camera that is capable of very good imaging.

herculodge

Paul, yeah, I found that link earlier and my Mac wouldn't boot. It needs repair, but at almost 7 years old and with a new one is it worth fixing? If I recycle it, can I trust someone to wipe away the hard drive?

Gary

Here's one photographer's opinion of the Sony RX100 Mk III. He also comments on the Mk I, which he owns. He says both of them are capable of DSLR grade images, but they can fit in a shirt pocket.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/sony_rx100_iii_hands_on.shtml

Other reviews of these Sony models have been uniformly positive.

Here is DPReview's conclusion:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sony-cybershot-dsc-rx100-m3/13

Paul

Jeff, you cannot trust that any recycler will wipe your iMac's hard drive. Maybe Apple will, better talk to them. Unfortunately as with other Apple products the 2007 iMac is a pain to disassemble by yourself (there are YouTube videos that show you how but it's a time consuming process).

Angelo

I have two IBM/Lenovo laptops from around 2004 still going strong. I'm still running Windows XP. None of my computers are worth upgrading----so at some point, I'll be faced with a decision of what to buy next.

herculodge

With all the sensitive info on the hard-drive, I need to be able to trust the recycle person. I would pay to stand there and watch him wipe it out.

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