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February 01, 2015

Comments

jonnybardo

That's a nice little dissertation there, Ulysses. Sounds similar, or at least related to, my "surrogate theory."

That said, do not quite agree with this statement: "I guess my point is, going for your dream isn't necessarily a bad choice when you consider that you'll be satisfied and able to enjoy it for many years to come, and without all the anxiety of that "journey" in between."

I don't think there is a way to avoid the "journey in between," even that the whole point of any aspect of life is that journey. That is life. Otherwise we'd envision our perfect scenario and lifestyle and then jump to that and exist in an Edenic state for the rest of our lives. If nothing else we need the "wrong" decisions to figure out what is "right."

Ulysses

Well, I was just giving an alternate viewpoint. I think if there's something you find yourself lusting after time and time again, then you kinda know what it is you want, and it is possible to make some sort of arrangement to acquire it without intermediate purchases. Of course, if you aren't really sure what you want then other steps are necessary, perhaps inevitable. However, if you are uncertain because you can't jump straight to the goal object, then I feel those intermediate steps will never be 100% fulfilling in the long-run, even if they are needed to help you form a clearer idea of what it is you really want.

If you've ever found yourself standing in a store staring at something for half an hour in a limbo of purchasing indecision, well, that's me. Such dilemmas would fry the positronic brain of an Asimovian robot. It's things like that, along with buyer's remorse and various other unpleasant feelings that aiming for the original goal would aim to avoid, but as I said earlier, that only works if you already know what it is you'd get if there were no other constraints.

Angelo

Great write-up----a lot to think about there. Somehow, I think this plays into it too: "New" vs. "Used." I'm a big believer in buying things used if the price is considerably lower than buying brand new. Obviously, it depends on the item we're talking about----but let's keep it on watches: I don't have a need to be the first person who ever wore the watch. So if it appears to be a reputable reseller, with some sort of buyer protection in place----I'm willing to aspire to an item that has been enjoyed by someone else. The nice thing about this is that it holds true for all price points. If you can get a $3000.00 watch for $1800.00, it's great. If you can get an $80.00 watch for $25.00, ditto. I guess in most cases, you sacrifice the warranty, but it seems like a good gamble to me.

jonnybardo

I completely agree, Angelo. Not only does it save a ton of money up front but also if and when you sell it again. That used watch you spend $1800 on could be sold for $1500-2000, depending upon condition and current supply and demand. In other words, used watches hold their value, new watches don't.

Unfortunately I don't think our dear friend Jeff has it in him to buy used! Actually, I can't remember many (any?) watches that he bought that weren't new, except for maybe the occasional Invicta.

Angelo

I think he has considered pre-owned watches, but not sure if he ever bought one. I on the other hand, have bought two from him and probably won't sell either of them!

herculodge

Pre-owned would have to be close to mint. If I don't buy a watch in a year I'll be tempted to the get the Seiko Spring Tuna for 2K used.

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