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April 28, 2015

Comments

Ulysses

It's a psychological thing. No one ever rates something a ten. It's some sort of unwritten rule, but basically if you rate something a ten, your opinion is considered less credible, because no one really believes any product is so perfect that it warrants such a rating. Interestingly, rating something a five (out of a one to five scale) is a lot more acceptable. Perhaps a five-star rating doesn't seem like so much of an exaggerated score because it is smaller, more modest. Maybe someone who does give a ten rating is still caught up in the euphoria of novelty that comes with a new purchase, but feelings change, the surge of oxytocin fades, and novelty doesn't last - the cycle begins again.

Don't search for perfection because you will probably never find it. Your brain is malleable, it is plastic and always changing. If your desires were fixed, you might just stand a chance, but we are organic beings, imperfect and mercurial and that is what makes us beautiful, and why if we ever were confronted with "perfection" we'd ultimately reject it in favour of something that was more like ourselves. That would be something relatable, with textures and flaws, not perfect but striving to be better than before.

Angelo

I don't have a perfect watch and I'm not sure there is one. Further, I'm not sure one can be created. There might be features you favor in several different watches----that could never be combined on the same watch. Examples: You might believe a certain movement to be perfect and a certain case to be perfect---but that movement doesn't fit in that case, so you end up compromising. Or you might love a case/dial/bezel design that looks perfect to you----but is best suited to a leather strap----and your preference is for a metal bracelet. Again, compromise. Everything might be perfect----but they just missed the shade of blue you feel would have been "perfect" for the dial. The list goes on and on. And as Ulysses pointed out, the brain is malleable----so perfection might be a moving target. I once had a toothbrush that I considered to be "perfect" for me. Walgreens probably stopped making that model in the 1980s. I wonder if I found new old stock somewhere----if I would still think it's a perfect toothbrush----or would I find it was passed by because of new advancements in toothbrush design!

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