« Great Watch Debate Part 1 | Main | It's Okay to Compromise Your Watch Appetites »

August 27, 2015

Comments

Ulysses

That book on your shelf - the one that says "You can do it!" sums up how I feel about this issue, even though I don't know the actual subject of that book. You can do it Jeff - you can have that Planet Ocean if you want it.

I think I said this a few months back but you're never going to know what it's like unless you try it. Find your nearest dealer - which sounds a bit sinister, doesn't it? Find your dealer, the guy that vends your watch-shaped blocks of crack that keep you on the watch-addiction merry-go-round... Anyway, find your nearest dealer and try it on and see how you feel about it. Should the worst happen, you end up purchasing it, get sick of it, and eventually flip it for a very modest hit since it's a quality marque and people will understand that they shouldn't expect a huge discount on a lightly used watch.

You can do it if you can get over that initial mental hurdle that makes you feel concerned about dropping so much cash on a single item. I liken it to that feeling you get when you get into a cold pool or the ocean and your breathing becomes rapid and shallow - it's not pleasant. The only real risk is something you touched upon in the video - what if after satiating your desire for the Omega, your wandering eye begins roving over the sensuous cushion-cased curves of a Panerai? Whenever we get something, there's the honeymoon phase but inevitably that passes and we get comfortable with our possession and it no longer gives us that thrill, that tingle that it used to. Do you want a partner for life, something that you've invested a lot of emotional energy and financial resources into, or a harem that you can use to satisfy your varying moods with convenience and comparatively little outlay, but with the knowledge in the back of your mind that these relationships are somehow fleeting, insubstantial and ultimately less satisfying? You can stave off those feelings by comparing your current pieces to other, more "high-end" watches, and it may be true they share some design cues, but ultimately you could describe them equally well by saying "this isn't an Omega, neither is that one, nor this one". And they never will be. It's one thing to accept them for what they are as valid watches in their own right, but when they are merely proxies for something you truly yearn for, then they'll never be able to give you 100% satisfaction.

Phil

I was just like you, Jeff, and I have made some progress with a high-low mix. I spent months -- nay, years -- closing my eyes every night and seeing the face of the Omega Speedmaster. Specifically, it was the famed "sapphire sandwich" -- with a more robust crystal than Neil's, Buzz's and Mike's, plus the awesome display back, but still with their authentic, hard-core, microgravity-appropriate manual winding movement. It took nearly as long -- years -- to save up, but then one afternoon after work I was able to walk into Tourneau and say, "I can't take it anymore."

I love that watch and I hope to wear it for the rest of my life.

Was that the end? Of course not. Naturally, at the time, I told myself it would be the last watch I'd ever buy -- that was the "bargain" -- but we are mortal men, after all. We're not made of stone. I am also a big G-Shock guy and the combination of awesome features and comparatively good prices from Casio means that there's no person alive who can resist when the right model comes along. So I have since added one of those as well and said to hell with the Omega being my "last" watch.

Right now the rotation is five watches, worked like this: Omega for work every day and formal functions. G-Shock A1100 is the go-to primary Weekend Watch. An older digital G-Shock Gulfman is for cooking in the kitchen given its superior stopwatch and countdown timer capabilities. Plus I have a metal ProTrek as the Work Travel watch, which combines a work-appropriate look with the digital timing precision and atomic clock-sync capabilities that are obviously essential for catching planes on time. Watch five is a Luminox SEAL model, a present from my wife, which is for wearing to the movies because the luminescent hands enable time-viewing without disturbing fellow movie-goers by activating a big, bright EL backlight.

To reach this point I got rid of two Swiss Army watches and a Citizen, as well as one or two other junky joke watches. It's not nirvana. Of course I still feel the itch. But it's proven to be a good place to live for the medium term. Like a lot of true watch people I was tempted by the Apple Watch but ultimately rejected it, which helped. It felt good to stand up to something that might have brought the wall crashing down and say, "this far, and no further!"

herculodge

Ulysses, since I'm prone to buying proxies for other things and since the honeymoon phase will end, I'm skeptical about pulling the Omega trigger, which isn't to say I might not get one someday. We shall see.

Phil, you sound as obsessive as I am.

Paul

Interesting product:
http://www.amazon.com/Griffin-Twenty-Bluetooth-Digital-Amplifier/dp/B00SCCT0FO/

Review:
http://www.slashgear.com/griffin-twenty-review-the-digital-bluetooth-amp-for-all-04381999/

Any thoughts?

herculodge

That Griffin is a good price. But it says it has 20 watts, yet you're supposed to connect it to speakers. I'm confused on that point.

Paul

Price on the Griffin can be as low as $108 shipped if you sign up for these guys coupon (it's a reputable site), but I am still trying to figure out its capabilities and see if others have comments/advice:

http://www.geekwire.com/geekwire-picks/geekwire-deals-bring-your-old-speakers-into-the-21st-century-with-this-bluetooth-amplifier/

herculodge

Paul, I like it but I don't know if I need it. Can the Blue Tooth feature work from one opposite room in a house to another? What's the range?

Paul

The stated range is 10 meters (33 feet), I assume without obstacles in between the receiver and transmitter.

Paul

One of the reviews on Griffin's web site says this:

"I have strong bluetooth reception to about 15 feet if no direct line of sight, but upwards of 20 with line of sight".

herculodge

I wonder how it would work as a radio replacement. In my house, though, I would only want to use it in my room, which I doubt would get blue tooth reception from the office.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Advertisements






  • Advertisements

Advertisements






  • Advertisements

Advertisements






  • Advertisements
My Photo

Advertisements






  • Advertisements

Advertisements






  • Advertisements

Advertisements






  • Advertisements

August 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          
Blog powered by Typepad

Pages

Companion Website: Breakthrough Writer

My Photo

Become a Fan